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CENSORSHIP SESSION 3: BANNED BOOKS (Dallas Institute)

Can we have a civil conversation about censorship? The Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture is about to find out. Partnering with The Dallas Morning News, Deep Vellum Publishing, and the Dallas Public Library, the institute is presenting a series of free panels.

SESSION 3: An in-depth look at banned books in the U.S., from Huckleberry Finn to To Kill a Mockingbird. A review and discussion of Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury’s classic treatment of censorship, which is as relevant today as when it was published in 1951. Venue: Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture

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CENSORSHIP SESSION 2: Public & Private Consequences of Censorship (Dallas)

Can we have a civil conversation about censorship? The Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture is about to find out. Partnering with The Dallas Morning News, Deep Vellum Publishing, and the Dallas Public Library, the institute is presenting a series of free panels.

SESSION 2: Public and Private Consequences of Censorship
What do writers, journalists, and teachers have to say? What is the current extent of censorship in the U.S.?

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CENSORSHIP SESSION 1: “The History of Censorship, Its Development in the West, and the Phenomenon of Banned Books” (Dallas)

Can we have a civil conversation about censorship? The Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture is about to find out. Partnering with The Dallas Morning News, Deep Vellum Publishing and the Dallas Public Library, the institute is presenting a series of free panels. The first takes place at 7 p.m. Sept. 26 in The Dallas Morning News’ auditorium at 1954 Commerce St. Free admission; Registration required.

That first panel, “The History of Censorship, Its Development in the West, and the Phenomenon of Banned Books,” will be moderated by News editor Mike Wilson. The panel will feature:

— Dale Carpenter, professor at Southern Methodist University’s Dedman Law School and author of Flagrant Conduct: The Story of Lawrence V. Texas;

— Sharon Grigsby,News metro columnist;

 Jo Giudice, director of libraries for the city of Dallas;

— Darryl Ratcliff, a social practice artist, community organizer, writer and co-founder of Ash Studios in Dallas; and

David Upham, a professor of politics and director of legal studies at the University of Dallas.

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Jung Young Moon U.S. Tour: Reading @ Dallas Institute of Humanities & Culture (Dallas)

Before_Cover_Consortium_CMYKJYM Twitter (7-17-15)

Jung Young Moon, South Korea’s award-winning, cult favorite, and most enigmatic contemporary author, a bestseller in France, Germany, and South Korea alike, comes to Dallas to present his novel Vaseline Buddha (Deep Vellum, 2016), which scrubs the depths of the human psyche to achieve a higher level of consciousness equal to Zen meditation. This tragicomic odyssey told through free association opens when our sleepless narrator thwarts a would-be thief outside his moonlit window, then delves into his subconscious imagination to explore a variety of geographical and mental locations—real, unreal, surreal—to explore the very nature of reality: from a treacherous flight in the mountains of Nepal to a park bench in Budapest to a bizarre conversation in Amsterdam to an encounter with an inflatable rubber dolphin floating in a small river in provincial France.

Vaseline Buddha is truly meaningful, rewarding literature. What makes this novel so fascinating is its permanent liminality and ambiguity: it is exactly the completely obvious which remains ultimately cryptic; it is exactly the linguistic hyper-precision which leads to confusion; it is exactly the “boring” stuff which becomes thrilling at another level; and it is exactly the humorous, ironic attitude of the author-narrator that proves his deep seriousness.

If the purpose of travel, in a way, is to shatter illusions about an unknown world, my travels are true to their purpose in that respect. A logic could be developed, a logic that’s perhaps forced, that it’s best not to travel at all in order to maintain an illusion, and in fact, when I considered traveling, I was always conflicted between maintaining an illusion by not traveling, and seeing an illusion get shattered by traveling.

Jung Young Moon‘s tour of the United States is made possible through the generous support of the Literature Translation Institute of Korea.

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