Tag Archives | deep vellum

CENSORSHIP SESSION 3: BANNED BOOKS (Dallas Institute)

Can we have a civil conversation about censorship? The Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture is about to find out. Partnering with The Dallas Morning News, Deep Vellum Publishing, and the Dallas Public Library, the institute is presenting a series of free panels.

SESSION 3: An in-depth look at banned books in the U.S., from Huckleberry Finn to To Kill a Mockingbird. A review and discussion of Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury’s classic treatment of censorship, which is as relevant today as when it was published in 1951. Venue: Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture

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Our First Texas Commission on the Arts Grant!!

We at Deep Vellum are honored and thrilled to share the news that we have been awarded our first-ever grant of $1,500 for Economic Development from the Texas Commission on the Arts (TCA) in its first round of 2019 Arts Respond grant programs. As a startup arts organization founded in 2013, we are proud to […]

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LIT CRAWL AUSTIN: Failure (Austin)

fields and Deep Vellum Present: F A I L U R E

Authors talk about experiences where they did not succeed, ideas that did not pan out, and strategies for overcoming writer’s block, rejection, and other difficulties.

Lit Crawl at Fast Folks at the 2017 Texas Book Festival.

Lit Crawl® Austin is a project of the Texas Book Festival and the Litquake Foundation. “Lit Crawl®” is the registered service mark of the Litquake Foundation.

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CENSORSHIP SESSION 2: Public & Private Consequences of Censorship (Dallas)

Can we have a civil conversation about censorship? The Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture is about to find out. Partnering with The Dallas Morning News, Deep Vellum Publishing, and the Dallas Public Library, the institute is presenting a series of free panels.

SESSION 2: Public and Private Consequences of Censorship
What do writers, journalists, and teachers have to say? What is the current extent of censorship in the U.S.?

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Ófeigur Sigurðsson w/ Taisia Kitaiskaia at BookPeople (Austin, TX)

Ófeigur Sigurðsson, author of Öræfi: The Wasteland, will be at BookPeople on October 19, in conversation with Taisia Kitaiskaia!

Sponsored by the Icelandic Literature Center with support from Iceland Naturally

 

Ófeigur Sigurðsson was born in Reykjavík in 1975. He is a graduate of the University of Iceland with a degree in philosophy. He made his poetry debut in 2001 with Skál fyrir skammdeginu (Cheers to the Winter Darkness), and published his first novel, Áferð (Texture), in 2005. Since then, he has published six books of poetry and three novels, in addition to his work as an accomplished translator. Sigurðsson was awarded the European Union Prize for Literature in 2011 for his novel, Jon, making him the first Icelander to receive the prize. His novel Öræfi: The Wasteland was published in Iceland in 2014 to great critical and commercial acclaim, and received the Book Merchant’s Prize in 2014 and the Icelandic Literature Prize in 2015. He currently resides in Antwerp, Belgium.

Taisia Kitaiskaia is a Russian-American poet and writer. She is the author of two books: LITERARY WITCHES: A CELEBRATION OF MAGICAL WOMEN WRITERS (Hachette/Seal, 2017), an NPR Best Book of 2017, and ASK BABA YAGA: OTHERWORLDLY ADVICE FOR EVERYDAY TROUBLES (Andrews McMeel, 2017). She has received fellowships from Yaddo and the James A. Michener Center for Writers (MFA in Poetry, 2015), and her poetry has been nominated twice for a Pushcart Prize, most recently by the Beloit Poetry Journal. Her poems can be found in journals such as Gulf Coast, Fence, Black Warrior Review, Crazyhorse, Pleiades, and Guernica, and her prose has appeared on Electric Literature, The Hairpin, Jezebel, and Bitch Media.

ABOUT THE BOOK

“Sigurðsson is without a doubt one of the best writers of his generation.” — Frettabladid Daily

After a grueling solo expedition on the Vatnajökull Glacier, Austrian toponymist Bernhardt Fingerberg returns to civilization, barely alive, and into the care of Dr. Lassi. The doctor, suspicious of his story, attempts to discover his real motives for venturing into the treacherous wastelands of Iceland — but the secrets she unravels may be more dangerous than they’re worth.

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Ófeigur Sigurðsson w/ David Searcy & Alex Dupree at Deep Vellum Books (Dallas, TX)

Ófeigur Sigurðsson, author of Öræfi: The Wasteland, will be at Deep Vellum Books on October 18, in conversation with David Searcy! Featuring music by Alex Dupree

Sponsored by the Icelandic Literature Center, with support from Iceland Naturally and Visit Dallas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ófeigur Sigurðsson was born in Reykjavík in 1975. He is a graduate of the University of Iceland with a degree in philosophy. He made his poetry debut in 2001 with Skál fyrir skammdeginu (Cheers to the Winter Darkness), and published his first novel, Áferð (Texture), in 2005. Since then, he has published six books of poetry and three novels, in addition to his work as an accomplished translator. Sigurðsson was awarded the European Union Prize for Literature in 2011 for his novel, Jón, making him the first Icelander to receive the prize. His novel Öræfi: The Wasteland was published in Iceland in 2014 to great critical and commercial acclaim, and received the Book Merchant’s Prize in 2014 and the Icelandic Literature Prize in 2015. He currently resides in Antwerp, Belgium.

David Searcy – back and forth between Dallas and Corsicana with his wife, the artist Nancy Rebal – is a writer whose recent essays (2013-15) have appeared in The Paris Review, Best American Essays 2013, Granta, and Esquire.  An essay collection, Shame and Wonder, was published with Random House January 2016.

Alex Dupree is a musician and writer living in Los Angeles. In 2005, he made his first record with The Trapdoor Band on a cassette 4-track in Austin, TX. His latest full-length You Winsome, You Lonesome was released by Keeled Scales in June 2017. His poems have appeared in the Southern Poetry Review, FIELD, and the Madison Review.

About the Book

After a grueling solo expedition on the Vatnajökull Glacier, Austrian toponymist Bernhardt Fingerberg returns to civilization, barely alive, and into the care of Dr. Lassi. The doctor, suspicious of his story, attempts to discover his real motives for venturing into the treacherous wastelands of Iceland — but the secrets she unravels may be more dangerous than they’re worth.
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CENSORSHIP SESSION 1: “The History of Censorship, Its Development in the West, and the Phenomenon of Banned Books” (Dallas)

Can we have a civil conversation about censorship? The Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture is about to find out. Partnering with The Dallas Morning News, Deep Vellum Publishing and the Dallas Public Library, the institute is presenting a series of free panels. The first takes place at 7 p.m. Sept. 26 in The Dallas Morning News’ auditorium at 1954 Commerce St. Free admission; Registration required.

That first panel, “The History of Censorship, Its Development in the West, and the Phenomenon of Banned Books,” will be moderated by News editor Mike Wilson. The panel will feature:

— Dale Carpenter, professor at Southern Methodist University’s Dedman Law School and author of Flagrant Conduct: The Story of Lawrence V. Texas;

— Sharon Grigsby,News metro columnist;

 Jo Giudice, director of libraries for the city of Dallas;

— Darryl Ratcliff, a social practice artist, community organizer, writer and co-founder of Ash Studios in Dallas; and

David Upham, a professor of politics and director of legal studies at the University of Dallas.

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Hay Festival at UT-Dallas w/ Bogotá39 Writers Eduardo Rabasa & Daniel Saldaña & Translator Christina MacSweeney (Dallas, Texas)

A conversation with two Mexican authors, their translator, and a publisher
Monday, Sep 10
p.m.  8:30 p.m.Location: Jonsson Hall 3.516

The Center for Translation Studies is hosting two Mexican authors from the 2017 Bogotá 39 listEduardo Rabasa and Daniel Saldaña—along with their translator Christina McSweeney, and Dallas’s own Will Evans, founder of Deep Vellum.

Contact Info:
Shelby Vincent, 972-883-2030
Questions? Email me.
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Sheila Heti & Sigrid Nunez Reading & Conversation (Dallas Museum of Art)

Reading and Conversation with Sheila Heti and Sigrid Nunez 

Thursday, July 19, 7:30 p.m.

Horchow Auditorium, Dallas Museum of Art

Presented by PEN AmericaArts & Letters Live, and Deep Vellum 

BUY TICKETS

Public $20

DMA Member/PEN Member/Friends of Deep Vellum/Educator $15

Student $10

In Sheila Heti’s latest book, Motherhood, the New York Times bestselling author asks what is gained and what is lost when a woman becomes a mother, treating the most consequential decision of early adulthood with the candor, originality, and humor that have won her international acclaim. Award-winning author Sigrid Nunez’s new novel The Friend is a New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice and tells the story of a woman who unexpectedly loses her lifelong best friend and mentor, and finds herself burdened with the unwanted dog he has left behind. It is a moving story of love, friendship, grief, healing, and the magical bond between a woman and her dog. The authors will read brief excerpts from their latest work and then engage in conversation, moderated by Roslyn Dawson Thompson, President and CEO of Dallas Women’s Foundation.

Sheila Heti is the author of eight books, including Motherhood, published in May 2018, and How Should a Person Be?, which was a New York Times Notable Book and was hailed by Time magazine as “one of the most talked-about books of the year.” She is co-editor of the New York Times bestseller Women in Clothes, and her books have been translated into a dozen languages. Her writing has been published in the New Yorker, Harper’s, McSweeney’s, the New York Times, and numerous other periodicals. Her play, All Our Happy Days Are Stupid, had a sold-out run at The Kitchen in New York and Videofag in Toronto. She appeared as Lenore Doolan in Leanne Shapton’s book Important Artifacts, and is currently writing its film adaptation.

Sigrid Nunez has published seven novels, including A Feather on the Breath of God, The Last of Her Kind, Salvation City, and, most recently, The Friend, a New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice. She is also the author of Sempre Susan: A Memoir of Susan Sontag. She has contributed to numerous journals, including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and Paris Review. Her work has appeared in several anthologies, including four Pushcart Prize volumes. Among Nunez’s honors and awards are a Whiting Writer’s Award, a Berlin Prize Fellowship, and two awards from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. She has taught at Columbia, Princeton, Boston University, and the New School, and has been a visiting writer or writer in residence at Amherst, Smith, and Vassar, as well as other colleges.

Authors will read brief excerpts from their latest work and then engage in conversation, moderated by Roslyn Dawson Thompson, President and CEO of Dallas Women’s Foundation.

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