Tag Archives | literary dallas

Deep Vellum’s Dallas Poet Chapbook Launch w/ Edyka Chilomé, Fatima-Ayan Malika Hirsi, Mike Soto

Deep Vellum is proud to present an evening celebrating the release of three poetry chapbooks by Edyka Chilomé, Fatima-Ayan Malika Hirsi, and Mike Soto: the first books we will publish by Dallas writers!

Friday, August 30, 2019
Deep Vellum Bookstore
7pm | Free
3000 Commerce Street | Dallas, TX 75226

The evening will feature the presentation of these brand-new poetic works made available for the first time by three of the most talented, important, and innovative writers in the Dallas literary community, celebrated and showcased via a collaborative reading and discussion. Quantities of the chapbooks will be limited, come early and stay late, and celebrate #LiteraryDallas!

The three local writers to be featured are all residents of the city of Dallas, and are representative of a broadly diverse swathe of Dallas’s population—writing in three differing, yet all amazing, poetic traditions—that make our city such an inspiring place to live, read, and write:

  • Edyka Chilomé is a literary arts activist, performer, and cultural worker currently based in Dallas. She is a queer child of Salvadorean and Mexican migrant activists, and was raised in social justice movements grounded in the tradition of spiritual activism. Edyka holds a BA in social and political philosophy with an emphasis on social justice from Loyola University Chicago, and an MA in Multicultural Women’s Studies from Texas Women’s University where her research focused on the decolonial power of spiritual [art]ivism. In 2017 Edyka was named top 25 most influential artists in DFW by Artist Uprising Magazine. Her play “Where Earth Meets the Sky,” produced by Cara Mia Theatre Company, was praised as 2018’s top Latinx Theatre Production in the DFW by Theater Jones Review. In the summer of 2018 Edyka was apart of Sandra Cisnero’s Macondo Writers Workshop and is currently a 2018-2019 Intercultural Leadership Institute Fellow.
  • Fatima-Ayan Malika Hirsi is the founder of Dark Moon Poetry & Arts, a monthly series spotlighting the creative feminine and non-binary POC energies of North Texas. She can often be found on sidewalks using her typewriter to birth poems for strangers or in classrooms unlocking the imaginations of children. She has been published in The Texas Observer, Entropy, The Boiler, Anthropology Now!, and elsewhere. Her work has been featured by WFAA, KERA, the Dallas Morning News, and others. Her first chapbook, Moon Woman, was published by Thoughtcrime Press in June 2018.
  • Mike Soto is a first generation Mexican-American writer raised in East Dallas and in a small town in Michoacán, who received his MFA in Poetry from Sarah Lawrence College. His debut chapbook, Beyond the Shadow’s Ink was published by Jeanne Duval Editions in 2010. His debut book-length work of poetry, A Grave is Given Supper, will be published by Deep Vellum in summer 2020.

This chapbook publication and reading presentation is brought to you by the City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs through a Cultural Vitality Project grant. The project was pitched to the OCA as the “Central Track Writers Project,” which takes its name and inspiration from the rich cultural history of Dallas: in the late 1800s, the Central Track rail lines separated Deep Ellum from the rest of Dallas (around where I-345 is today). At that time, uncommon diversity among business owners in Deep Ellum created a unique social climate where cultural interaction took place in the fields of music, visual art, theater, and literature. Deep Vellum has tried to carry on the legacy of our neighborhood’s vibrant cultural history since our inception (even incorporating a pun on the neighborhood into our own name!), and seeks to do the same with the Central Track Writers Project, by creating opportunities for writers within our own city limits, harnessing the creative power of Deep Ellum’s present cultural capital and status as an urban core arts destination, while as a platform for individual literary artists and ideas to share their vision with the world, displaying to the city of Dallas and the world that literature is art, and that Dallas literature is an art to be celebrated, read, and shared.

The Central Track Writers Project is produced with the support of a Cultural Vitality Program grant from the City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs

 

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Ófeigur Sigurðsson w/ Shelby Vincent at the University of Texas at Dallas! (Dallas, TX)

Ófeigur Sigurðsson, author of Öræfi: The Wasteland, will be at the University of Texas at Dallas on October 17, in conversation with Shelby Vincent!

Sponsored by the Icelandic Literature Center, with support from Iceland Naturally and Visit Dallas.

Ófeigur Sigurðsson was born in Reykjavík in 1975. He is a graduate of the University of Iceland with a degree in philosophy. He made his poetry debut in 2001 with Skál fyrir skammdeginu (Cheers to the Winter Darkness), and published his first novel, Áferð (Texture), in 2005. Since then, he has published six books of poetry and three novels, in addition to his work as an accomplished translator. Sigurðsson was awarded the European Union Prize for Literature in 2011 for his novel, Jón, making him the first Icelander to receive the prize. His novel Öræfi: The Wasteland was published in Iceland in 2014 to great critical and commercial acclaim, and received the Book Merchant’s Prize in 2014 and the Icelandic Literature Prize in 2015. He currently resides in Antwerp, Belgium.

Shelby Vincent is the managing editor of Translation Review and a lecturer and research associate at the University of Texas at Dallas, where she earned her PhD in Translation Studies. In her free time, she is a literary translator, and has contributed to the translation of Woman Street Artists of Latin America (Manic D Press), as well as translating Carmen Boullosa’s Heavens on Earth. She is currently translating another book by Carmen Boullosa, La virgin y el violen (The Virgin and the Violin).

About the Book

After a grueling solo expedition on the Vatnajökull Glacier, Austrian toponymist Bernhardt Fingerberg returns to civilization, barely alive, and into the care of Dr. Lassi. The doctor, suspicious of his story, attempts to discover his real motives for venturing into the treacherous wastelands of Iceland — but the secrets she unravels may be more dangerous than they’re worth.
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Ófeigur Sigurðsson at UCLA (Los Angeles, CA)

Ófeigur Sigurðsson, author of Öræfi: The Wasteland, will be at UCLA on October 15!

FULL DETAILS TO COME SOON!

Sponsored by the Icelandic Literature Center and with support from Iceland Naturally

 

About the Author

Ófeigur Sigurðsson was born in Reykjavík in 1975. He is a graduate of the University of Iceland with a degree in philosophy. He made his poetry debut in 2001 with Skál fyrir skammdeginu (Cheers to the Winter Darkness), and published his first novel, Áferð (Texture), in 2005. Since then, he has published six books of poetry and three novels, in addition to his work as an accomplished translator. Sigurðsson was awarded the European Union Prize for Literature in 2011 for his novel, Jón, making him the first Icelander to receive the prize. His novel Öræfi: The Wasteland was published in Iceland in 2014 to great critical and commercial acclaim, and received the Book Merchant’s Prize in 2014 and the Icelandic Literature Prize in 2015. He currently resides in Antwerp, Belgium.

About the Translator

Lytton Smith is the award-winning author of four books of poetry and several translations from the Icelandic, including Jón Gnarr’s childhood memoir trilogy, The Indian, The Pirate, and The Outlaw (Deep Vellum); The Ambassador by Bragi Ólafsson (Open Letter); and Children in Reindeer Woods by Kristín Ómarsdóttir (Open Letter). His translation of Guðbergur Bergsson’s Tómas Jónsson—Bestseller (Tómas Jónsson, metsölubók) was published by Open Letter Books in 2017. He is an Assistant Professor of English at SUNY Geneseo in upstate New York.

About the Book

After a grueling solo expedition on the Vatnajökull Glacier, Austrian toponymist Bernhardt Fingerberg returns to civilization, barely alive, and into the care of Dr. Lassi. The doctor, suspicious of his story, attempts to discover his real motives for venturing into the treacherous wastelands of Iceland — but the secrets she unravels may be more dangerous than they’re worth.

 

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Ófeigur Sigurðsson at LitQuake (San Francisco, CA)

Mark your calendars! Ófeigur Sigurðsson will be at this year’s LitQuake Festival on October 13!

Words Around the World: A Sense of Place
Oct 13, 12-1pm, 2174 Market St.
Geographic sense of place informs a strong and deeply felt identity, and in the case of fiction, this place is also reflected in character, narrative, atmosphere, voice, and language. Hear novelists Carol Bensimon (We All Loved Cowboys) and Ófeigur Sigurðsson (Öræfi: The Wasteland) discuss their recent works, set respectively within a road trip through Brazil, and the desolate landscape of Iceland. Moderated by author Lucy Jane Bledsoe. FREE, $5-10 suggested donation

FULL SCHEDULE AVAILABLE SEPTEMBER 10!

Sponsored by the Icelandic Literature Center, with support from Iceland Naturally

About the Author

Ófeigur Sigurðsson was born in Reykjavík in 1975. He is a graduate of the University of Iceland with a degree in philosophy. He made his poetry debut in 2001 with Skál fyrir skammdeginu (Cheers to the Winter Darkness), and published his first novel, Áferð (Texture), in 2005. Since then, he has published six books of poetry and three novels, in addition to his work as an accomplished translator. Sigurðsson was awarded the European Union Prize for Literature in 2011 for his novel, Jón, making him the first Icelander to receive the prize. His novel Öræfi: The Wasteland was published in Iceland in 2014 to great critical and commercial acclaim, and received the Book Merchant’s Prize in 2014 and the Icelandic Literature Prize in 2015. He currently resides in Antwerp, Belgium.

About the Book

After a grueling solo expedition on the Vatnajökull Glacier, Austrian toponymist Bernhardt Fingerberg returns to civilization, barely alive, and into the care of Dr. Lassi. The doctor, suspicious of his story, attempts to discover his real motives for venturing into the treacherous wastelands of Iceland — but the secrets she unravels may be more dangerous than they’re worth.

About the Festival

One of the West Coast’s most beloved annual literary festivals, this smart, eclectic, 76% free ten-day gathering draws booklovers of all ages and backgrounds to enjoy words and ideas, straight from the artists’ mouths. Now with 160 venues in its 18th year, the festival’s uniquely portable format provides even greater access to literature.
Litquake nurtures and amplifies an ever-expanding community of conversation and engagement in the Bay Area’s cultural landscape. Litquake’s mission is to contribute to the creative economy at large and make more literature more available to readers of all ages through ever-evolving performances, readings, workshops, and film programs during the annual festival and its year-round programming. By commingling public life and literary art, Litquake uses literature as an agent of public good.
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Ófeigur Sigurðsson at the Icelandic Embassy (Washington, DC)

Ófeigur Sigurðsson, author of Öræfi: The Wasteland, will be at the Icelandic Embassy on October 11!

Sponsored by the Icelandic Literature Center, with support from Iceland Naturally

 


FULL DETAILS TO COME SOON!

Ófeigur Sigurðsson was born in Reykjavík in 1975. He is a graduate of the University of Iceland with a degree in philosophy. He made his poetry debut in 2001 with Skál fyrir skammdeginu (Cheers to the Winter Darkness), and published his first novel, Áferð (Texture), in 2005. Since then, he has published six books of poetry and three novels, in addition to his work as an accomplished translator. Sigurðsson was awarded the European Union Prize for Literature in 2011 for his novel, Jón, making him the first Icelander to receive the prize. His novel Öræfi: The Wasteland was published in Iceland in 2014 to great critical and commercial acclaim, and received the Book Merchant’s Prize in 2014 and the Icelandic Literature Prize in 2015. He currently resides in Antwerp, Belgium.

About the Book

After a grueling solo expedition on the Vatnajökull Glacier, Austrian toponymist Bernhardt Fingerberg returns to civilization, barely alive, and into the care of Dr. Lassi. The doctor, suspicious of his story, attempts to discover his real motives for venturing into the treacherous wastelands of Iceland — but the secrets she unravels may be more dangerous than they’re worth.
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Ófeigur Sigurðsson w/ Lytton Smith at SUNY-Geneseo (Geneseo, NY)

Ófeigur Sigurðsson, author of Öræfi: The Wasteland, will be at SUNY-Geneseo on October 10, in conversation with Lytton Smith!

Sponsored by the Icelandic Literature Center and with support from Iceland Naturally

 

About the Author

Ófeigur Sigurðsson was born in Reykjavík in 1975. He is a graduate of the University of Iceland with a degree in philosophy. He made his poetry debut in 2001 with Skál fyrir skammdeginu (Cheers to the Winter Darkness), and published his first novel, Áferð (Texture), in 2005. Since then, he has published six books of poetry and three novels, in addition to his work as an accomplished translator. Sigurðsson was awarded the European Union Prize for Literature in 2011 for his novel, Jón, making him the first Icelander to receive the prize. His novel Öræfi: The Wasteland was published in Iceland in 2014 to great critical and commercial acclaim, and received the Book Merchant’s Prize in 2014 and the Icelandic Literature Prize in 2015. He currently resides in Antwerp, Belgium.

About the Translator

Lytton Smith is the award-winning author of four books of poetry and several translations from the Icelandic, including Jón Gnarr’s childhood memoir trilogy, The Indian, The Pirate, and The Outlaw (Deep Vellum); The Ambassador by Bragi Ólafsson (Open Letter); and Children in Reindeer Woods by Kristín Ómarsdóttir (Open Letter). His translation of Guðbergur Bergsson’s Tómas Jónsson—Bestseller (Tómas Jónsson, metsölubók) was published by Open Letter Books in 2017. He is an Assistant Professor of English at SUNY Geneseo in upstate New York.

About the Book

After a grueling solo expedition on the Vatnajökull Glacier, Austrian toponymist Bernhardt Fingerberg returns to civilization, barely alive, and into the care of Dr. Lassi. The doctor, suspicious of his story, attempts to discover his real motives for venturing into the treacherous wastelands of Iceland — but the secrets she unravels may be more dangerous than they’re worth.

 

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A Week in #LiteraryDallas

In the new #LiteraryDallas (check the hashtag, The Wild Detectives & us are spreading the love, get into it!), life is packed with literary events. Tonight, the Austin-based Writers’ League of Texas is  presenting a panel discussion on the topic: “Being a Good Literary Citizen” with authors Sanderia Faye, Karen Blumenthal, Jeramey Kraatz, and our very […]

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