Tag Archives | reading

Katie Shireen Assef at East Bay Booksellers

Join Katie Shireen Assef, translator of Valérie Mréjen’s Black Forest.

A man decides he is old enough. A woman returns early from a lovers’ retreat to a bottle of pills at home. And how should you explain the nuances of contemporary Paris to your mother, twenty – five years dead? Valérie Mréjen’s Black Forest is a book of mourning that isn’t morbid or sentimental, but rather an elegant and wryly humorous brace against the void. With a paradoxically detached intimacy, Mréjen follows death’s dark and twisted path through the lives it touches, wringing out every possible meaning—or non–meaning— along the way. A writer at the height of her career who draws comparisons to Georges Perec and Nathalie Sarraute, Mréjen has cemented her status as an auteur with a singular voice, guiding us through the Black Forest of ghosts that populate her subconscious.

“Mréjen’s crystalline prose never grasps for sentimentality, and her meticulous, humane, and powerful volume unforgettably depicts the way the dead experience life after death in the traces they leave in the minds of the living.” ― Publishers Weekly

“A wonderfully dark little book in a perfect translation that will haunt you long after you put it down. I’m so happy to have read it.” — Emma Ramadan, translator of Sphinx (Deep Vellum, 2016) and Me & Other Writings (Dorothy Project, 2019)

“Filmmaker and novelist Valérie Mréjen has an eye that cuts and chisels. Nothing escapes her intuitive vigilance…With her, details are isolated and become powerful revealers of truth. Between life and death, in the tradition of Nathalie Sarraute, she seeks to write in the very place where consciousness, emotion, and reason are born, and then fade… she shows that absence can also be a form of presence.” — Marine Landrot, Télérama

“A sentence by Valérie Mréjen never pushes, rather glides along the page like on silk… Mréjen puts her finger on the wound, as delicately as possible.” — Eric Chevillard, Le Mondeca

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Donna Wilhelm at Arts & Letters Live

Peggy Wallace Kennedy & Donna Wilhelm in conversation with Krys Boyd of KERA

Doors will open at 7pm. The event begins at 7:30pm.

A Life of My Own follows Donna Wilhelm’s path from a lonely child in an immigrant boarding house to corporate wife and mother, to middle-aged divorcee, and finally her reinvention into a philanthropist, arts advocate, and humanitarian. This evocative memoir reveals her unique upbringing, diverse work history, family challenges and journey of personal growth with unbridled honesty and will inspire others to take ownership of their stories. Peggy Wallace Kennedy, seen as the “symbol of racial reconciliation” (Washington Post), is the daughter of one of America’s most virulent segregationists, former governor of Alabama and presidential candidate George Wallace, who ultimately renounced his views at the end of his life. Wallace Kennedy’s powerful memoir The Broken Road is both timely and timeless and speaks to change, atonement, activism, and racial healing.

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Ozsváth & Turner – A Dramatic Reading of Faust @ The Dallas Institute

Goethe’s Faust: A Dramatic Reading of a New Translation

Goethe’s Faust is at the heart of the great change that created the modern world. Goethe’s vision of the unity of nature and the human spirit, his philosophy of growth and process, and his astonishing poetry, both lushly lyrical and philosophically brilliant, influenced the English romantics and the American transcendentalists and helped drive a new evolutionary view of reality.

Zsuzsanna Ozsváth and Frederick Turner have completed a new, dynamic poetic translation of the play. In this public debut of their latest work, Dr. Turner, the celebrated actor Fred Curchack, and other performers will give the play a stirring dramatic reading on the Institute stage.

Event is $10 for Educator Members and free for students

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Jung Young Moon at Garcia Street Books (Santa Fe)

Join Jung Young Moon as he discusses his newest Deep Vellum title, Seven Samurai Swept Away in a River.

In his inimitable, recursive, meditative style that reads like a comedic zen koan but contains universes, Seven Samurai Swept Away in a River recounts Korean cult writer’s Jung Young Moon’s time spent at an artist’s and writers residency in small-town Texas. In an attempt to understand what a “true Texan should know,” the author reflects on his outsider experiences in this most unique of places, learning to two-step, musing on cowboy hats and cowboy churches, blending his observations with a meditative rumination on the history of Texas and the events that shaped the state, from the first settlers to Jacky Ruby and Lee Harvey Oswald. All the while, the author is asking what a novel is and must be, while accompanied by a fictional cast of seven samurai who the author invents and carries with him, silent companions in a pantomime of existential theater. Jung blends fact with imagination, humor with reflection, and meaning with meaninglessness, as his meanderings become an absorbing, engaging, quintessential novel of ideas.

Jung Young Moon, born in 1965, is an award-winning Korean writer and translator. A graduate of Seoul National University with a degree in psychology, Jung is also an alum of the University of Iowa’s International Writing Program, and has been a resident at the University of California at Berkeley’s Center for Korean Study and the 100 West Corsicana Artists’ & Writers’ Residency in Texas, which inspired his novel Seven Samurai Swept Away in a River. Deep Vellum published his novel Vaseline Buddha in 2016, and will publish his linked novella trilogy Arriving in a Thick Fog in 2020.

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Deep Vellum’s Dallas Poet Chapbook Launch w/ Edyka Chilomé, Fatima-Ayan Malika Hirsi, Mike Soto

Deep Vellum is proud to present an evening celebrating the release of three poetry chapbooks by Edyka Chilomé, Fatima-Ayan Malika Hirsi, and Mike Soto: the first books we will publish by Dallas writers!

Friday, August 30, 2019
Deep Vellum Bookstore
7pm | Free
3000 Commerce Street | Dallas, TX 75226

The evening will feature the presentation of these brand-new poetic works made available for the first time by three of the most talented, important, and innovative writers in the Dallas literary community, celebrated and showcased via a collaborative reading and discussion. Quantities of the chapbooks will be limited, come early and stay late, and celebrate #LiteraryDallas!

The three local writers to be featured are all residents of the city of Dallas, and are representative of a broadly diverse swathe of Dallas’s population—writing in three differing, yet all amazing, poetic traditions—that make our city such an inspiring place to live, read, and write:

  • Edyka Chilomé is a literary arts activist, performer, and cultural worker currently based in Dallas. She is a queer child of Salvadorean and Mexican migrant activists, and was raised in social justice movements grounded in the tradition of spiritual activism. Edyka holds a BA in social and political philosophy with an emphasis on social justice from Loyola University Chicago, and an MA in Multicultural Women’s Studies from Texas Women’s University where her research focused on the decolonial power of spiritual [art]ivism. In 2017 Edyka was named top 25 most influential artists in DFW by Artist Uprising Magazine. Her play “Where Earth Meets the Sky,” produced by Cara Mia Theatre Company, was praised as 2018’s top Latinx Theatre Production in the DFW by Theater Jones Review. In the summer of 2018 Edyka was apart of Sandra Cisnero’s Macondo Writers Workshop and is currently a 2018-2019 Intercultural Leadership Institute Fellow.
  • Fatima-Ayan Malika Hirsi is the founder of Dark Moon Poetry & Arts, a monthly series spotlighting the creative feminine and non-binary POC energies of North Texas. She can often be found on sidewalks using her typewriter to birth poems for strangers or in classrooms unlocking the imaginations of children. She has been published in The Texas Observer, Entropy, The Boiler, Anthropology Now!, and elsewhere. Her work has been featured by WFAA, KERA, the Dallas Morning News, and others. Her first chapbook, Moon Woman, was published by Thoughtcrime Press in June 2018.
  • Mike Soto is a first generation Mexican-American writer raised in East Dallas and in a small town in Michoacán, who received his MFA in Poetry from Sarah Lawrence College. His debut chapbook, Beyond the Shadow’s Ink was published by Jeanne Duval Editions in 2010. His debut book-length work of poetry, A Grave is Given Supper, will be published by Deep Vellum in summer 2020.

This chapbook publication and reading presentation is brought to you by the City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs through a Cultural Vitality Project grant. The project was pitched to the OCA as the “Central Track Writers Project,” which takes its name and inspiration from the rich cultural history of Dallas: in the late 1800s, the Central Track rail lines separated Deep Ellum from the rest of Dallas (around where I-345 is today). At that time, uncommon diversity among business owners in Deep Ellum created a unique social climate where cultural interaction took place in the fields of music, visual art, theater, and literature. Deep Vellum has tried to carry on the legacy of our neighborhood’s vibrant cultural history since our inception (even incorporating a pun on the neighborhood into our own name!), and seeks to do the same with the Central Track Writers Project, by creating opportunities for writers within our own city limits, harnessing the creative power of Deep Ellum’s present cultural capital and status as an urban core arts destination, while as a platform for individual literary artists and ideas to share their vision with the world, displaying to the city of Dallas and the world that literature is art, and that Dallas literature is an art to be celebrated, read, and shared.

The Central Track Writers Project is produced with the support of a Cultural Vitality Program grant from the City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs

 

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