Tag Archives | translation

It’s a #WITmonth Giveaway!

Here it is: our glorious WIT stack. How many of these amazing titles have you read? Happy August! Or as we like to call it, Women in Translation Month. 2019 marks the sixth year of celebrating books in translation authored/translated by women, an effort begun by Meytal Radzinski. While this celebration comes from a place […]

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Dallas Festival of Books & Ideas (Ozsváth & Turner)

2019 Dallas Festival of Books & Ideas – Summer in the City

Kick off summer with a festival of books, authors and reading on every floor of the Central Library. Listen to writers talk about their work, discover a new author and learn about the publishing process from people who’ve done it. Plus, add to the community quilt in the mini quilt show and find the next great read in the Friends of the Dallas Public Library’s Book Cellar.

While you’re at the library, all ages can sign up for the Mayor’s Summer Reading Challenge. Plus, teens can stick around after the festival to see local youth compete in the first Teen Rap Battle!

Featured Authors

More Author Information…

Featured Presenters

  • The Crew of the Barque Lone Star (Sherlock Holmes Literary Society)
  • Dallas Area Romance Authors
  • Deep Vellum
  • The Dock Bookshop
  • DFW Writers Workshop
  • Jane Austen Society of North Texas
  • Society of Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators
  • University of North Texas Mayborn School of Journalism
  • WordSpace

This event is made possible thanks to the Freda Gail Stern Fund of the Friends of the Dallas Public Library.

The Dallas Festival of Books & Ideas, May 28 – June 1, is a city-wide event aimed at energizing the people of Dallas through the power of books and ideas. A partnership between Dallas Public Library, the Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture, The Dallas Morning News and the Dallas Museum of Art, the festival takes place at multiple sites. For a complete list of events, visit http://thedallasfestival.com

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Ozsváth & Turner – Goethe Translation Launch Party @ UT-Dallas

The Golden Goblet: Selected Poems of Goethe Translated by Dr. Zsuzsanna Ozsváth and Prof. Fred Turner
May 18, 2019 | 6pm – SP/N Gallery

The Ackerman Center at UT Dallas is celebrating the first of two new books being published this year by founding director Dr. Zsuzsanna Ozsváth. Please join us for a wine and cheese reception to honor both Dr. Ozsváth and co-translator Prof. Turner. The SP/N Gallery is located on the far northwest corner of campus in Synergy Park North. Click here for a map.

Read more about this new book here.

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Ófeigur Sigurðsson w/ Taisia Kitaiskaia at BookPeople (Austin, TX)

Ófeigur Sigurðsson, author of Öræfi: The Wasteland, will be at BookPeople on October 19, in conversation with Taisia Kitaiskaia!

Sponsored by the Icelandic Literature Center with support from Iceland Naturally

 

Ófeigur Sigurðsson was born in Reykjavík in 1975. He is a graduate of the University of Iceland with a degree in philosophy. He made his poetry debut in 2001 with Skál fyrir skammdeginu (Cheers to the Winter Darkness), and published his first novel, Áferð (Texture), in 2005. Since then, he has published six books of poetry and three novels, in addition to his work as an accomplished translator. Sigurðsson was awarded the European Union Prize for Literature in 2011 for his novel, Jon, making him the first Icelander to receive the prize. His novel Öræfi: The Wasteland was published in Iceland in 2014 to great critical and commercial acclaim, and received the Book Merchant’s Prize in 2014 and the Icelandic Literature Prize in 2015. He currently resides in Antwerp, Belgium.

Taisia Kitaiskaia is a Russian-American poet and writer. She is the author of two books: LITERARY WITCHES: A CELEBRATION OF MAGICAL WOMEN WRITERS (Hachette/Seal, 2017), an NPR Best Book of 2017, and ASK BABA YAGA: OTHERWORLDLY ADVICE FOR EVERYDAY TROUBLES (Andrews McMeel, 2017). She has received fellowships from Yaddo and the James A. Michener Center for Writers (MFA in Poetry, 2015), and her poetry has been nominated twice for a Pushcart Prize, most recently by the Beloit Poetry Journal. Her poems can be found in journals such as Gulf Coast, Fence, Black Warrior Review, Crazyhorse, Pleiades, and Guernica, and her prose has appeared on Electric Literature, The Hairpin, Jezebel, and Bitch Media.

ABOUT THE BOOK

“Sigurðsson is without a doubt one of the best writers of his generation.” — Frettabladid Daily

After a grueling solo expedition on the Vatnajökull Glacier, Austrian toponymist Bernhardt Fingerberg returns to civilization, barely alive, and into the care of Dr. Lassi. The doctor, suspicious of his story, attempts to discover his real motives for venturing into the treacherous wastelands of Iceland — but the secrets she unravels may be more dangerous than they’re worth.

PRE-ORDER YOUR COPY

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Hay Festival at UT-Dallas w/ Bogotá39 Writers Eduardo Rabasa & Daniel Saldaña & Translator Christina MacSweeney (Dallas, Texas)

A conversation with two Mexican authors, their translator, and a publisher
Monday, Sep 10
p.m.  8:30 p.m.Location: Jonsson Hall 3.516

The Center for Translation Studies is hosting two Mexican authors from the 2017 Bogotá 39 listEduardo Rabasa and Daniel Saldaña—along with their translator Christina McSweeney, and Dallas’s own Will Evans, founder of Deep Vellum.

Contact Info:
Shelby Vincent, 972-883-2030
Questions? Email me.
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Jung Young Moon @ Malvern Books (Austin, TX)

Before_Cover_Consortium_CMYKJYM Twitter (7-17-15)

Jung Young Moon, South Korea’s award-winning, cult favorite, and most enigmatic contemporary author, a bestseller in France, Germany, and South Korea alike, comes to Austin to present his novels A Contrived World (Dalkey Archive, 2016) and Vaseline Buddha (Deep Vellum, 2016), which scrubs the depths of the human psyche to achieve a higher level of consciousness equal to Zen meditation. This tragicomic odyssey told through free association opens when our sleepless narrator thwarts a would-be thief outside his moonlit window, then delves into his subconscious imagination to explore a variety of geographical and mental locations—real, unreal, surreal—to explore the very nature of reality: from a treacherous flight in the mountains of Nepal to a park bench in Budapest to a bizarre conversation in Amsterdam to an encounter with an inflatable rubber dolphin floating in a small river in provincial France.

Vaseline Buddha is truly meaningful, rewarding literature. What makes this novel so fascinating is its permanent liminality and ambiguity: it is exactly the completely obvious which remains ultimately cryptic; it is exactly the linguistic hyper-precision which leads to confusion; it is exactly the “boring” stuff which becomes thrilling at another level; and it is exactly the humorous, ironic attitude of the author-narrator that proves his deep seriousness.

If the purpose of travel, in a way, is to shatter illusions about an unknown world, my travels are true to their purpose in that respect. A logic could be developed, a logic that’s perhaps forced, that it’s best not to travel at all in order to maintain an illusion, and in fact, when I considered traveling, I was always conflicted between maintaining an illusion by not traveling, and seeing an illusion get shattered by traveling.

Jung Young Moon‘s tour of the United States is made possible through the generous support of the Literature Translation Institute of Korea.

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Jung Young Moon U.S. Tour: Reading @ Dallas Institute of Humanities & Culture (Dallas)

Before_Cover_Consortium_CMYKJYM Twitter (7-17-15)

Jung Young Moon, South Korea’s award-winning, cult favorite, and most enigmatic contemporary author, a bestseller in France, Germany, and South Korea alike, comes to Dallas to present his novel Vaseline Buddha (Deep Vellum, 2016), which scrubs the depths of the human psyche to achieve a higher level of consciousness equal to Zen meditation. This tragicomic odyssey told through free association opens when our sleepless narrator thwarts a would-be thief outside his moonlit window, then delves into his subconscious imagination to explore a variety of geographical and mental locations—real, unreal, surreal—to explore the very nature of reality: from a treacherous flight in the mountains of Nepal to a park bench in Budapest to a bizarre conversation in Amsterdam to an encounter with an inflatable rubber dolphin floating in a small river in provincial France.

Vaseline Buddha is truly meaningful, rewarding literature. What makes this novel so fascinating is its permanent liminality and ambiguity: it is exactly the completely obvious which remains ultimately cryptic; it is exactly the linguistic hyper-precision which leads to confusion; it is exactly the “boring” stuff which becomes thrilling at another level; and it is exactly the humorous, ironic attitude of the author-narrator that proves his deep seriousness.

If the purpose of travel, in a way, is to shatter illusions about an unknown world, my travels are true to their purpose in that respect. A logic could be developed, a logic that’s perhaps forced, that it’s best not to travel at all in order to maintain an illusion, and in fact, when I considered traveling, I was always conflicted between maintaining an illusion by not traveling, and seeing an illusion get shattered by traveling.

Jung Young Moon‘s tour of the United States is made possible through the generous support of the Literature Translation Institute of Korea.

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Jung Young Moon U.S. Tour: Reading @ Crow Collection of Asian Art (Dallas)

Before_Cover_Consortium_CMYKJYM Twitter (7-17-15)

Jung Young Moon, South Korea’s award-winning, cult favorite, and most enigmatic contemporary author, a bestseller in France, Germany, and South Korea alike, comes to Dallas to present his novel Vaseline Buddha (Deep Vellum, 2016), which scrubs the depths of the human psyche to achieve a higher level of consciousness equal to Zen meditation. This tragicomic odyssey told through free association opens when our sleepless narrator thwarts a would-be thief outside his moonlit window, then delves into his subconscious imagination to explore a variety of geographical and mental locations—real, unreal, surreal—to explore the very nature of reality: from a treacherous flight in the mountains of Nepal to a park bench in Budapest to a bizarre conversation in Amsterdam to an encounter with an inflatable rubber dolphin floating in a small river in provincial France.

Vaseline Buddha is truly meaningful, rewarding literature. What makes this novel so fascinating is its permanent liminality and ambiguity: it is exactly the completely obvious which remains ultimately cryptic; it is exactly the linguistic hyper-precision which leads to confusion; it is exactly the “boring” stuff which becomes thrilling at another level; and it is exactly the humorous, ironic attitude of the author-narrator that proves his deep seriousness.

If the purpose of travel, in a way, is to shatter illusions about an unknown world, my travels are true to their purpose in that respect. A logic could be developed, a logic that’s perhaps forced, that it’s best not to travel at all in order to maintain an illusion, and in fact, when I considered traveling, I was always conflicted between maintaining an illusion by not traveling, and seeing an illusion get shattered by traveling.

Jung Young Moon‘s tour of the United States is made possible through the generous support of the Literature Translation Institute of Korea.

Continue Reading 0